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Hi there!

I'm Margaret, a female traveller from Nigeria, and welcome to my personal blog , TheAjalaBug.com.

Here, I document my adventures in travel and life experiences generally. Hope you get inspired!

The national war museum | My historical quest in Abia state (Part 1/2)

The national war museum | My historical quest in Abia state (Part 1/2)

“The whole world is divided for me into two parts: one is she, and there is all happiness, hope, light; the other is where she is not, and there is dejection and darkness...”  Leo Tolstoy on War and Peace

I recently learnt that Abia is an abbreviation formed from four different groups of people namely; Aba, Bende, Isuikwuota and Afikpo. 

Abia State, specifically Umuahia the capital, holds some of the deepest history in Nigeria. I will not dive into politics and the history of the fall of Enugu and how Umuahia became the capital of Biafra. However, this post covers one of the relics of the period which has become one of the biggest tourist attraction in the city; the war museum.

This trip was quite an emotional one for me. I remembered clearly my Dad's narration of the civil war and absolutely no words can describe how I felt as the tour guide explained the history to me again. He said the museum was a reminder of the ugliness of war but more importantly, a preservation of our history, while as a nation, we continuously struggle to heal and make reconciliations

That said, here is my travel story...... As you read on my post on Imo state and perhaps, Akwa Ibom State, I mentioned I took a road trip from Imo state to Akwa Ibom passing through Abia state, so I thought to take a tour of the state. Umuahia in Abia State is two hours drive from Owerri in Imo state.

The war museum is situated close to the centre of the town. We (myself and the driver) were walmly welcomed to the museum by a tour guide. He showed us the biafra radio and all the various sophisticated weapons used during the war. Some of the deadly weapons we saw were fabricated by locals due the exigencies of the war. 

Thoughts of the war and its effect on the lives of many family deeply saddens me that I can barely continue narrating. Let my pictures below do some talking too.

  This is the first contact we got with Abia state. It was a warm welcome with this round-about

This is the first contact we got with Abia state. It was a warm welcome with this round-about

  After a few minutes, we arrived at the National War Museum.

After a few minutes, we arrived at the National War Museum.

  The museum was commissioned in 1985. It comprises of three galleries that cover traditional warfare, the armed forces and the Nigerian Civil War weapon galleries . 

The museum was commissioned in 1985. It comprises of three galleries that cover traditional warfare, the armed forces and the Nigerian Civil War weapon galleries

  Locally fabricated weapons of mass destruction

Locally fabricated weapons of mass destruction

  Locally fabricated weapons

Locally fabricated weapons

  Locally fabricated Biafran weapons

Locally fabricated Biafran weapons

  Locally fabricated weapons with the Biafran map. That's Biafra radio at the back which Ojukwu used in communicating called  shortwave radio “the Voice of Biafra”

Locally fabricated weapons with the Biafran map. That's Biafra radio at the back which Ojukwu used in communicating called shortwave radio “the Voice of Biafra”

  Locally fabricated Biafran weapons

Locally fabricated Biafran weapons

  The Nigeria military armours

The Nigeria military armours

  Phew! Please read....Egypt oooo

Phew! Please read....Egypt oooo

  A part of the Nigerian military armour

A part of the Nigerian military armour

  The Nigerian military war tank

The Nigerian military war tank

Final Thoughts

The museum’s location is significant because it was near the bunker where “the Voice of Biafra” was transmitted from. The radio, Voice of Biafra, was the mouth-piece for Biafra during the war.

The museum is a constant reminder that war should never be the last resort. The collection of weapons were from both the Nigerian military and the defunct Republic of Biafra. Obviously, the Biafrans were highly skilled with technology, even as far back the war (6 July 1967 – 15 January 1970). There is hope for Nigeria in terms of manufacturing.

There is a small gate fee of N500 and an non-regrettable experience afterwards. The war museum is an interesting place to visit for all history lovers.

As usual, thanks for reading. Kindly drop any comments and share your experiences with us. Thanks for all your support. I see you all.

Margaret.

The infamous Ojukwu bunker | My historical quest in Abia state (Part 2/2)

The infamous Ojukwu bunker | My historical quest in Abia state (Part 2/2)

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